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Digging Into The History Of Hanford's Radioactive Waste Tunnels


One week ago workers found a tunnel filled with radioactive waste caved in at the Hanford nuclear site in southeast Washington. State officials and tribes are calling for quick cleanup action.

But how did we get here?

Historian Michele Gerber wrote a 64-page report on the history of the PUREX plant 24 years ago. PUREX is short for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant. And now, its tunnels are infamous since the cave-in was discovered. The plant was built from 1953 to 1955 and opened “hot” in January 1956.

“It was President Eisenhower’s most important project,” Gerber said. “When he was elected he called it Project X. And this project was literally number one in his priorities was to increase nuclear weapons production for a program that he called ‘Massive Retaliation.’”

Gerber said then, in the early Cold War, Eisenhower wanted to look strong to deter the Russians. So he built a plutonium-making war horse. 


The PUREX plant is longer than three football fields. It stands 64 feet above the ground and goes another 40 feet below ground. Its job was to concentrate as much plutonium as possible from irradiated rods coming out of Hanford’s reactors. It was efficient.

“In one month it could do what a World War II plant would take 26 months to do,” Gerber said.

Building A Train To Nowhere

Water-filled railcars brought the radioactive rods to the plant. The rods were lifted out by remote crane and then dissolved with acids. Plutonium traveled through the long plant in different baths of chemicals. It became more and more concentrated. 


Workers were shielded from dose by huge concrete walls.

Don Wodrich, was a mechanical engineer who supported work on PUREX and other plants for about 40 years. He described what happened to the equipment after it was exposed to all those chemicals in the plant.

“Sometimes those pieces of equipment would fail. They might corrode through from the acids or something,” Wodrich said. “And so then they would have to be remotely removed and disposed of so the new piece could be put in its place.”

And that’s where this train to nowhere was needed. The same train tunnel that recently collapsed.

“And for much of the equipment that was smaller — they could put it in a concrete box and put it on a flat car on a railroad tunnel and take it out to the burial grounds and bury it,” Wodrich said. “But for some of the very large pieces of equipment that were very radioactive, they couldn’t get a box big enough to hold the equipment and yet get it out of the tunnel.”

‘Obviously A Very Poor Construction Method’

The tunnel was made of creosoted railroad timbers and concrete.

“Was always a concern about how long that would last,” Wodrich said. “And I, I can recall people many many years ago worried about that and saying we need to go see how that’s doing and how long that might last.”

“It’s obviously a very poor construction method in our view, in our terms, we would never do anything like that,” Gerber said. “We know radiation breaks down materials, it breaks down wood. It causes wood to decay and collapse.”

But there are so many things to clean up at Hanford. Radioactive sludge in house-sized tanks underground. Radioactive cesium capsules bathed in a large pool. And hundreds of contaminated buildings — five of which are giants like the PUREX plant. The train tunnel might have just been pretty low on the Hanford to-do list. Or the nation’s.

“There are so many issues: Medical coverage, entitlements, defense,” Gerber said. “It’s really hard I suppose to think about these old DOE sites. But, somebody has to fix them.”

The tunnel is a reminder of all that’s buried deep at Hanford.

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Hanford

In 1943, as World War II raged in Europe and the Pacific, thousands of men and women from across the United States began arriving in a remote part of south-central Washington state. They knew very little about why the U.S. government had hired them — only that it was an important project to support the war effort. It was a project that would change the world forever.



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